Legal Affairs
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March|April 2006
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VARTKES'S LIST
By Michael Bobelian
Of the million or more Armenians executed by Ottoman Turks 90 years ago, thousands had insurance from New York Life. A slip-and-fall lawyer uncovered the list of policyholders and, by forcing the company to pay their heirs, gave voice to the victims of genocide.

CRUSADERS IN WINGTIPS
By Rachel Morris
As American courts give more weight to imported precedents, a band of Christian lawyers is going abroad to shape foreign law—before it comes home to hurt their cause.

THE ACCIDENTAL ABOLITIONIST
By Jake Lundberg
How a judge infamous for defending slavery came to write his Dred Scott dissent.

YOUNG GUNS
By Bernard E. Harcourt
Peppered with fear, lust, and awe, the language kids use to describe guns reveals the spell that firearms cast over troubled teens.

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FROM THE VAULT 5/15/2006
TO HAVE AND HOLD A GREEN CARD
The most common way for immigrants to settle legally in the United States is to marry a U.S. citizen. It's a process that last year made legal residents of 252,193 spouses of U.S. citizens—each one of them interviewed by a CIS officer. But not surprisingly, this path to legal residency has been littered with fraud and more than a few sham marriages. Sniffing out the illegitimacy of these unions falls to immigration officers like Garcia. —Melissa Nann Burke, Jan|Feb 2006.

FROM THE VAULT 5/1/06
BAD NEIGHBORS
Laura Savage, who loved riding her bike through the town as a child, is a dressmaker whose business has dropped 40 percent since the Diamond residents started leaving. "Hush money," she calls the company's donations to the town, "for keeping our mouths shut and smiling when someone says 'Shell.'" —Emily Bazelon, May|June 2003

FROM THE VAULT 05/1/06
KEEPING THE INTERNET NEUTRAL?
In the end, network neutrality rules are not the only way government can try to lower the costs of market entry for the national economy. However, it is one of the simplest, and it has proven very effective over the last decade. That's why I favor whatever it takes—whether its just a code of honor or an actual law—that keeps the network as neutral as possible as between market competitors, and tries to keep the price of market entry as low as possible. —Timothy Wu

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